MENU

HISTORY OF THE “QUARTETTO”

1. BIRTH OF THE SOCIETÀ DEL QUARTETTO DI MILANO – The first seasons: 1864-1866

Frontespizio dello Statuto della Società del Quartetto

Frontespizio dello Statuto della Società del Quartetto

Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony was performed for the first time in Italy on April 18th 1878, in Milan, in a memorable concert conducted by Franco Faccio and organized by the Società del Quartetto. It was the culminating moment of the great project to perform all of Beethoven’s symphonies – a project that had begun with the “Pastoral” Symphony in 1867 and that the Società brought to completion thanks to great effort and determination. The fact may seem surprising, for two reasons: for the great delay with which that masterpiece arrived in Italy – more than half a century after its premiere, in Vienna, in 1824; and then, because the performance was organised by a Society that, by definition, was focused on chamber music.
The explanation, however, is simple, and it is to be found in the history of the musical life of our country, of Milan, and of the Società del Quartetto. That history is not restricted to a particular period, however important and even long-lasting, of our musical 19th century; it is interwoven, rather, with all of the circumstances that made the 20th century so varied and changeable and that are now carrying the Society into the new millennium, as artistically lively and institutionally independent as ever.

It all began with a reaction, halfway through the 19th century, against opera’s predominance over Italy’s entire musical world – a predominance that restricted the space for instrumental music nearly to the point of disappearance. There was minimal symphonic and concert activity in the theatres, a lack of concert halls and permanent ensembles, little chamber music in private homes, and general ignorance of what was happening north of the Alps. It is not surprising, therefore, that Beethoven was largely unknown, as were the instrumental works of Mozart, Haydn, Schubert, Schumann and Mendelssohn. Chamber music was known only to its most avid fans.

Tito Ricordi

Tito Ricordi

Among this group was Tito Ricordi, of the Ricordi music publishing house, who was born in 1813 – son of the founder, Giovanni – and was an excellent pianist. From childhood on he was able to hear, at home, the great foreign piano and violin virtuosi who came (rarely, in reality) to Milan. He enjoyed getting together with them to read through scores that were not accessible to the general public, for the reasons given above, and as a music publisher he was specifically interested in opening a new market alongside opera, in which Ricordi was in top position, with composers of the calibre of Donizetti, Bellini and Verdi. He knew that a Quartet Society had been founded in Florence, in 1861, with the precise intention of moving away from the provincialism of “only opera,” and of broadening musical horizons through the great classic and romantic European instrumental tradition, with concerts, lectures, publications and commissions; its founder was Abramo Basevi, a merchant by profession and music lover by passion – a nonconformist extrovert with a volcanic, unpredictable temperament.

Such personalities were proliferating in Milan, too. They were tired of the pre-established order; they wanted to discard everything, to change art, music and literature, and they called themselves scapigliati (disheveled, in the sense of disorderly, bohemian). Among them were the writer and composer Arrigo Boito and the composer and conductor Franco Faccio, both of them very young but well inserted into Milan’s intellectual circles. There were signs of life at the Milan conservatory, too, and a new generation of music critics (Filippo Filippi and Antonio Ghislanzoni, for instance) had acquainted themselves with the international musical literature and seemed to be interested in new trends.

Tito Ricordi sensed that the times were favourable, if not exactly ripe, and he decided to act. On 1 September 1863 he proposed constituting a society with the task of “encouraging the cultivators of good music through public experiments, through the founding of competitions and through the issuing of a Musical Gazette, an organ of the Society.” In the spring of 1864 the project took effect, and, once a statute had been prepared, an administrative council was nominated; it boasted a perfect balance within Milan’s intellectual community: music teachers, noblemen and professional people were coordinated by Giulio Ricordi, Tito’s young son, who was an excellent publicist and a future head of the publishing house. For obvious reasons of prudence and convenience, Tito Ricordi, Boito, Faccio and Filippi were not in the administration, although they were the moving forces behind the initiative. Members were divided into protectors (“music lovers and amateurs”), professionals (“working artists and teachers”) and correspondents (“people resident outside Milan”). Annual membership dues were set at 40 lire for the protectors and 25 for the professionals plus an “entrance tax” of 20 and 10 lire, respectively.

The first event was set for 29 June at 2 p.m. in the conservatory’s auditorium.

Programma del primo ‘Esperimento’, 29 giugno 1964

Programma del primo ‘Esperimento’, 29 giugno 1964

The first concert (described as an “experiment”) had a mixed programme, although solely of chamber music: Mozart’s Quartet in G Major, op. 10 no. 1 (K 387); Mendelssohn’s Piano Quartet in F minor, op. 2; and Beethoven’s Septet, op. 20, and Piano Sonata in D minor, op. 31 no. 2 (“The Tempest”). The turnout was good (more than 100 people attended) and the reaction satisfactory. Arrigo Boito’s account in the newborn Giornale della Società del Quartetto was enthusiastic – but it could hardly have been otherwise. A second experiment took place on 20 November (Schumann, Mozart, Bazzini, Chopin, Mendelssohn and Beethoven), a third on 11 December (Beethoven, Boccherini, Hummel, Piatti and Mendelssohn), and the first season ended on 8 January 1865 with solo and chamber pieces (quartets and quintets) by Haydn, Mendelssohn, Heller, Onslow and Beethoven.

A reading of the programmes sheds light on the Society’s efforts to respect its mission: to present a great deal of music by great foreign classical composers, but also to feature new works, preferably by Italians. Thus, one notes the omnipresent Beethoven and Mozart and Boito’s adored Mendelssohn, but also the presence of contemporary Italians – Bazzini and Piatti – and “new” foreigners – Heller and Onslow. And attention was paid to the audience by avoiding the potential boredom of similar sounds – thus the alternation of strings with piano solo and with ensembles with and without winds.

The format seemed to function, and for a couple of years it remained unchanged. Great Bach and little Croff were added to the aforementioned great classics, as were the classic Italians Boccherini and Tartini, the contemporary Andreoli, Bazzini and Faccio, and more recent foreigners such as Meyerbeer, Spohr and Vieuxtemps.

The performers, too, remained largely the same, inasmuch as the Society created a basic ensemble made up of some competent string players (Bassi, Santelli, Truffi, Cavallini, Corbellini, Rampazzini, Quarenghi and Negri), with the frequent addition of real virtuosi (Bazzini, Sivori and Piatti), plus excellent pianists (Andreoli and Fumagalli) and fine winds; the combinations and permutations of this group made a virtually infinite repertoire possible. In any case, famous names and foreign performers were not sought: attention was given to the music, not to its performers.

The number of experiments grew, from the original four to eight in 1866, and the balance-sheet wasn’t bad, since the first year ended with a credit of 2,807 lire. The number of members also grew: in 1864 there were 87 protectors, 31 professionals and 48 correspondents; by the following year the total had increased by 84. The Giornale, on the other hand, had to be discontinued, for lack of funds and for excessive costs.

2. Programmes and performers

Thus, the Società del Quartetto di Milano was created in order to diffuse all non-operatic music, not only chamber music. From the start, the founders also kept orchestral music in mind; in this they were urged on by Faccio, who, after the lukewarm success of his early compositions, was becoming successful as a conductor in both the theatre and the concert hall.

Franco Faccio

Franco Faccio

The first symphonic experiment took place at the start of the 1867 season, on 21 March (repeated ten days later), with overtures by Gluck, Rossini, Weber and Foroni, followed by the Milan premiere Beethoven’ s “Pastoral” Symphony. An orchestra, put together for the occasion, was led by a conductor whose name has not been preserved. From then on, and until the end of the century, every season of the Società del Quartetto included at least a couple of orchestral experiments, with up-to-date, interesting programmes, usually featuring the great German classical-romantic tradition. The first regular conductor was Terziani, but Franco Faccio gradually came to the fore, and it is to him that such memorable occasions as the aforementioned 1878 “premiere” of the Ninth Symphony were owed; that event also completed the larger project (begun ten years earlier, with the “Pastoral”) of performing all of Beethoven’s symphonies.

Hans von Bülow

Hans von Bülow

A significant taste of the Ninth, however, had been offered during the 1870 season, when Hans von Bülow conducted the Scherzo and Adagio movements in a grandiose concert commemorating the centenary of Beethoven’s birth. The programme also included the Eighth Symphony, the Consecration of the House and Egmont overtures and the Romanze for violin, op. 50. Bülow dominated the 1870 season, performing in four of the six “experiments” as a solo and chamber pianist, in repertoire that stretched from Bach to Liszt, from Beethoven to Anton Rubinstein, and included Mozart, Schumann and Chopin.

The exploration of old and new chamber repertoire continued contemporaneously, with the Società del Quartetto’s “regular ensemble. Beethoven’s quartets dominated, but many new pieces were also performed; these included works that had won prizes offered by the Society – compositions by Bazzini, Faccio and, later, Martucci, Bolzoni and Frugatta.

Anton Rubinstein

Anton Rubinstein

The year 1878, with the premiere of the Ninth and the conclusion of the Beethoven symphony cycle, marked a turning-point in the Society’s programmes, in part because the decade-long “symphonic experiments” had enriched the city. In the winter of 1877, Andreoli, an old collaborator, had founded the Popular Concerts at the conservatory, and within ten years he would manage to organize nearly 100 concerts. Two years later, Franco Faccio would create La Scala’s Orchestral Society to present a regular symphonic season alongside the opera season.
The Società del Quartetto’s “symphonic experiments” continued, of course, but with the explicit aim of developing original notions, such as single-themed concerts revolving around an individual composer, performer or occasion. After Bülow’s Beethoven celebrations, the 1874 season opened with Anton Rubinstein as conductor, pianist and composer. Saint-Saëns was the dedicatee of six of the 1879 season’s eight concerts: the French musician focused on his own and others’ compositions conductor, solo pianist or chamber music pianist. Wagner’s death in 1883 inspired a concert of his orchestral music, conducted by Faccio. Another grand all-Wagner concert was conducted by the expert Felix Mottl, in 1890. Richard Strauss – 24 years old and not yet famous – appeared in 1888 as conductor of his Symphony, op. 12, among other works.

Arturo Toscanini e Gigi Ansbacher

Arturo Toscanini e Gigi Ansbacher

Nevertheless, the participation of orchestras tended to be limited to special occasions, such as the three grand concerts conducted by Arturo Toscanini (1900, 1901, 1905) and the visits of the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Hans Richter (1900), the Berlin Tonkünstler conducted by Richard Strauss (1903) and the Orchestra of La Scala conducted by Martucci, who led one of his own symphonies (1904). But orchestras often continued to accompany soloists, as in memorable first performances of the Beethoven and Brahms violin concerti (1915) and Brahms’s two piano concerti (1919 and 1923), with the soloists Arrigo Serato and Nino Rossi, respectively, conducted by Enrico Polo.

The Society’s interest in the vocal-instrumental repertoire also continued, thereby filling an obvious lacuna in Milan’s musical life. In 1871, the Cappella del Duomo (Cathedral Chapel) presented a mixed programme as a prelude to a long series of Italian and foreign choruses performing Renaissance, classical and modern polyphonic works. Attention was of course focused on Bach, and the culmination was the first Milanese performance of the St. Matthew Passion, conducted by Volkmar Andreae, on 22 April 1911.

Nathan Milstein

Nathan Milstein

The all-Bach concerts had begun in 1894 with two “experiments” conducted by Guglielmo Andreoli, with Milanese soloists and choirs. The tradition continued with Enrico Polo (1915), Michelangelo Abbado (1921) and Reinhart (1932 and 1935). Günther Ramin and the Leipzig Gewandhaus ensemble brought the St. John Passion to Milan during the 1954 season. Over the following years, the Passions returned, along with Christmas and Easter oratorios and the Mass in B minor. Attention was turned, contemporaneously, to Bach’s instrumental output, with our customary love for philological rigour and monographic style: there was a concentration on the violin works (1910, with Arrigo Serato) and piano works (1916, Ferruccio Busoni), and performances of all of the Brandenburg Concerti (1938, with the Busch ensemble; 1961, with Münchinger); the complete Well-Tempered Clavier (1958, Jörg Demus); all of the keyboard partitas (1961, Alexis Weissenberg); the sonatas and partitas for solo violin (1960 and 1961, Nathan Milstein; 1989, Miriam Fried); and all of the suites for solo cello (1990-91, Mischa Maisky).

Quaretto Busch

Quaretto Busch

With respect to cycles of complete works, the Society’s strong-point in programming is Beethoven, and especially the great series of string quartets. The first cycle was, of course, the most difficult one. It began in 1864 with op. 59 no. 3, during the Society’s second “experiment”, and ended half a century later, in 1913, when the Rosé Quartet performed the Grosse Fuge, op. 133. In the meantime, however, all of the others had been played many times, with the maximum number of performances given to the three op. 59 quartets and op. 131 (however strange this may seem). The Busch Quartet presented all of the quartets in six concerts during the 1927 season; the experiment worked and was repeated in 1931. In 1943, in the midst of the war, the Strub Quartet presented another complete series. The Hungarian Quartet gave an “almost complete” cycle spread over three seasons (1954, 1955, 1957). Then it was the turn of the Amadeus Quartet and the Quartetto Italiano (half a cycle each, 1966 and 1967), then the “troika” Amadeus-Cleveland-Guarneri (1977) and the well-known Tokyo and Guarneri quartets together with the young Sine Nomine and Giovine Quartetto Italiano (1990). Also memorable were the complete violin and piano sonatas, given over three evenings (1928, Adolf Busch and Rudolf Serkin; 1970, Zino Francescatti and Robert Casadesus); the cello-piano evenings (1920, Andrea Hekking and Alfredo Casella; 1947, Enrico Mainardi and Carlo Zecchi); all of the string trios (1970, Trio Italiano); and all-Beethoven piano recitals with great keyboard soloists – most memorably, Ferruccio Busoni in 1915 and Rudolf Serkin in 1964.

Arthur Rubinstein

Arthur Rubinstein

There were solo evenings also for the other greats: Domenico Scarlatti (1938, Wanda Landowska), Mozart (1948, Hans Leygraf), Chopin (1911, José Viana de la Motta; 1943, Nikita Magaloff; 1964, Arthur Rubinstein) and Schumann (1952, Benno Moisseiwitsch; 1955, Claudio Arrau). Great attention was paid to Mozart, some of whose quartets appear almost every season, often accompanied by other instrumental combinations – especially the string quintets (1932, complete, with the Busch Quartet). Brahms’s chamber music has been explored in depth, with the violin sonatas (for the first time in 1933, with Busch and Serkin), the piano trios (since 1927; in 1947 with the Trio di Trieste), the quintets, sextets and, obviously, quartets; many of these events were entrusted to the Busch Quartet augmented by prestigious soloists. Haydn, too, has been featured, inasmuch as he is recognised as the father of the string quartet, and so have all the other great exponents of the genre, from Schubert, Schumann and Mendelssohn down to the twentieth century’s protagonists.

Dmitrij Šostakovič e Mstislav Rostropovich

Dmitrij Šostakovič e Mstislav Rostropovich

Among these last, Béla Bartók has always occupied a special place: his First Quartet was presented in 1926 by the Budapest Quartet and the Sixth in 1946 by the Quartetto Italiano, with frequent repetitions during the following decade. The first complete series was given in 1982, a second one in 1995 (fiftieth anniversary of the composer’s death).  Also programmed have been quartets by Berg (Lyric Suite, 1934), Bloch, Casella, Ghedini, Hindemith, Malipiero, Martinů, Milhaud, Pizzetti, Prokofiev, Schönberg and Shostakovich. The local premiere of Schönberg’s Pierrot Lunaire was presented in 1924, conducted by the composer. Igor Stravinsky appeared as both pianist (together with his son Soulima) and composer in 1936. An entire evening was dedicated to Vladimir Vogel’s Fall of the City of Wagadu (1960). Les Percussions de Strasbourg debuted in 1967. In 1974 a short, three-concert festival devoted only to modern music was organized, with pieces by Sciarrino, Cage, Bussotti, Castiglioni, Pousseur, Messiaen, Berg, Maderna, Berio, Boulez, Petrassi, Gorecki and Donatoni; this demonstrated the Society’s ongoing interest in contemporary chamber music, which was perfectly in keeping with what took place during its early years, when the names of living composers Saint-Saëns, Brahms, Grieg, Rachmaninov, Rubinstein, Ravel, Debussy, Fauré and the Italians Bazzini, Bottesini, Faccio, Martucci and Sgambati appeared on its programmes. Many of these last were prestigious composers and in some cases winners of the Society’s competitions for new works.

Other curiosities included the Don Cossack Choir (1924), Marian Anderson singing African-American spirituals (1936), and Cathy Berberian’s unusual vocal itineraries (1977).

The great variety in the Society’s programmes derives naturally from the great variety of the performers and from the criteria in accordance with which they are invited. The formula that had worked for the first few seasons was carried on for a long time. For decades, a core of fine Milanese instrumentalists was responsible for preparing programmes in the old “academy” style, in which individual performers combined into various groupings or provided a solo intermezzo (usually for piano). Early in the twentieth century, Enrico Polo’s string quartet served as a basic group, and Polo often performed also as violin soloist and conductor. Another important collaborator during this period was the Capet Quartet, which debuted in 1908 with three memorable concerts, one of which was entirely dedicated to the music of Gabriel Fauré, with the composer at the piano.

Adolf Bush, Rudolf Serkin e Arturo Toscanini

Adolf Bush, Rudolf Serkin e Arturo Toscanini

Between the two world wars, this role was taken by no less a figure than Adolf Busch, who, beginning in 1923, became a regular guest as violin soloist and as leader of his string quartet and of the flexible chamber ensemble that bore his name. The pianist Rudolf Serkin – versatile soloist, accompanist and chamber musician – also debuted with him and would become the artist who performed with the Society more frequently than anyone else. After the Second World War, the “academy” style largely disappeared, although in its way it continued through the Complesso Strumentale Italiano (Italian Instrumental Ensemble), led by Cesare Ferraresi, another violinist who shaped Milan’s musical life. Among chamber orchestras, the most frequently heard were I Musici (debut in 1953), I Virtuosi di Roma (1954), the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra (1954) and I Solisti di Zagreb (1955).

In the meantime, the presence of more or less permanent Italian and foreign chamber ensembles grew, from the duo to the chamber orchestra, with all the intermediate groupings. The Society makes no distinction among nationalities, so long as the interpretative level is at the top or on the verge of reaching the top. Following the first, aforementioned Italian virtuoso soloists, in 1870 the first great foreigner, Hans von Bülow arrived, followed by Anton Rubinstein (1874). Then came the violinists Josef Joachim (1880, three concerts), Pablo de Sarasate (1882), Eugène Ysaÿe (1889), Fritz Kreisler (1895); the cellist David Popper (1889); and the pianists Francis Planté (1883) and Eugen d’Albert (1885). Ferruccio Busoni debuted in 1896 and was followed by Paderewski in 1897.

Maurizio Pollini e Rudolf Serkin

Maurizio Pollini e Rudolf Serkin

All the great international twentieth-century virtuosi made appearances. Here is a short, incomplete list, beginning with pianists, showing only the debut years (all of them returned repeatedly) and ending with the 1970s, without including the most promising exponents of the younger generations: Moritz Rosenthal (1900), Teresa Carreño (1900), Raoul Pugno (1901), Alfredo Casella (1903), Wanda Landowska (1905, as harpsichordist), Wilhelm Backhaus (1907), Alfred Cortot (1908), Frédéric Lamond (1911), Artur Schnabel (1913), Leopold Godowsky (1914), Nino Rossi (1915), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (1916), Eduard Risler (1919), Ricardo Viñes (1919), Walter Gieseking (1921), Wilhelm Kempff (1922), Rudolf Serkin (1923), Arthur Rubinstein (1924), José Iturbi (1925), Edwin Fischer (1925), Sergei Rachmaninoff (1928), Vladimir Horowitz (1930), Carlo Vidusso (1934), Elly Ney (1939), Egon Petri (1939), Nikita Magaloff (1940), Dinu Lipatti (1946), Clara Haskil (1946), Robert Casadesus (1948), Claudio Arrau (1949), Friedrich Gulda (1950), Benno Moiseiwitsch (1953), Rudolf Firkušný (1955), Emil Gilels (1959), Martha Argerich (1959), Maurizio Pollini (1960), Alexis Weissenberg (1961), Dino Ciani (1962), Sviatoslav Richter (1963), Vladimir Ashkenazy (1964), Murray Perahia (1967), Radu Lupu (1973), Alfred Brendel (1976) and Krystian Zimerman (1977). Not to be forgotten are the piano duos Gorini and Lorenzi (1948), Badura-Skoda and Demus (1957), Canino and Ballista (1966) and Gold and Fizdale (1973).

Isaac Stern

Isaac Stern

The list of violinists is no less impressive than that of the pianists; it is arranged here according to the same criteria: Jacques Thibaud (1902), Mischa Elman (1911), Franz von Vecsey (1911), Carl Flesch (1913), Georges Enesco (1914), Váša Příhoda (1920), Bronislaw Huberman (1920), Josef Szigeti (1925), Jascha Heifetz (1926), Nathan Milstein (1931), Yehudi Menuhin (1932), Georg Kulenkampff (1933), Zino Francescatti (1936), Ginette Neveu (1948), Arthur Grumiaux (1948), Isaac Stern (1950), Henryk Szeryng (1953), Leonid Kogan (1956), David Oistrakh (1957), Salvatore Accardo (1959), Uto Ughi (1963), Itzhak Perlman (1966), Pinchas Zukerman (1969), Shlomo Mintz (1982).

Mstislav Rostropovich

Mstislav Rostropovich

Among cellists: Pablo Casals (1906), Enrico Mainardi (1915), Gaspar Cassadó (1924), Gregor Piatigorsky (1931), Pierre Fournier (1942), Antonio Janigro (1950), Paul Tortelier (1953) and Mstislav Rostropovich (1965). Other instrumentalists included the clarinettist Richard Stolzman (1979), flautist Jean-Pierre Rampal (1969), guitarist Andrés Segovia (1926) and organist Fernando Germani (1950).

Nor must we forget the great voices, because the Society has always given ample space to Lieder and other non-operatic vocal music, thanks to singers of the level of Toti dal Monte (1918), Elisabeth Schumann (1933), Lotte Lehmann (1936), Suzanne Danco (1942), Kirsten Flagstad (1948), Nicola Rossi Lemeni (1949), Victoria de los Angeles (1950), Kathleen Ferrier (1951), Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (1952), Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (1954), Irmgard Seefried (1955), Oralia Dominguez (1956), Maureen Forrester (1961), Gérard Souzay (1961), Montserrat Caballé (1964), Teresa Berganza (1964), Gundula Janowitz (1965), Elly Ameling (1966) and Christa Ludwig (1972).

There have been so many ensembles, starting with piano trios: from the historic Cortot-Thibaud-Casals trio (1908) early in the century to Casella-Poltronieri-Bonucci (1936), Fischer-Kulenkampf-Mainardi (1941), Istomin-Stern-Rose (1964) and up to the still active Trio di Milano (1972) and Beaux-Arts Trio (1973). Special tribute must be paid to the Trio di Trieste, a regular presence from the time of its debut in 1942.

Quartetto Italiano

Quartetto Italiano

But the Society’s cornerstone has always been the string quartet. The list is a long one, and brevity requires some painful cuts: there were the Fiorentino (1872), Becker (1876), Boemo (1895), Rosé (1897), Joachim (1905), Polo (1907), Capet (1908), Ševčík (1909), Budapest (1921), Busch (1921), Lehner (1922), Flonzaley (1924), Poltronieri (1925), Pro Arte (1925), Kolisch (1933), Strub (1941), Italiano (1947), Hungarian (1955), Juilliard (1956), Amadeus (1957), Janáček (1958), Koeckert (1959), Tátrai (1960), Végh (1961), Borodin (1961), LaSalle (1965), Guarneri (1969), Bartók (1970), Tokyo (1972), Smetana (1973), Cleveland (1974), Berg (1976), Lindsay (1980) and Melos (1980). Many of these magnificent ensembles have also provided – through subtraction or addition of players – countless evenings of trios, quintets, sextets, septets and octets, which have brought the chamber music repertoire before singularly attentive and faithful audiences. And let us not forgot some worthy pre-existing expanded groups, such as the Quintetto Chigiano (1941).

3. Pubblico

SocietaQuartettoMilano_Pubblico

Già, il pubblico del Quartetto! Se ne sono dette tante, con simpatia e con malignità, tramandando luoghi comuni che ormai fanno parte della storia ultrasecolare della Società. Di sicuro sappiamo che è fatto di circa 1800 soci che da decenni, spesso da generazioni rinnovano una quota associativa che da sola copre tutti i costi di gestione delle singole stagioni. Fin dalla fondazione, sono stati esclusi finanziamenti esterni pubblici o privati, e non è ammessa la vendita di biglietti per singoli concerti. È una condizione rigida e rispettata, che ha però consentito la totale libertà di scelte artistiche e organizzative, e della quale ciascun socio è giustamente orgoglioso. Può apparire elemento di chiusura, invece la lunga esperienza ha dimostrato che dà forza e coesione alla Società, e che alla lunga consente un rapporto di collaborazione equilibrato e fruttuoso con il mondo musicale e culturale che le sta attorno.

I soci che affollano la Sala Verdi del Conservatorio nella canonica serata del martedì sono pur sempre gli eredi dei padri fondatori e delle loro idee. Vengono dal mondo delle professioni, della scuola di ogni ordine, dall’industria e dal commercio e, secondo un altro tipico luogo comune, rappresentano bene la città di Milano. Ben rappresentata è sempre stata la comunità musicale milanese, con i docenti del Conservatorio in prima fila, non solo sul palcoscenico ma anche nel consiglio direttivo della Società. Alternandosi con nobili e industriali e grandi professionisti, sono stati presidenti i musicisti Arrigo Boito (1912), Ildebrando Pizzetti (1928-1936), Gianandrea Gavazzeni (1992-1996).

Inizialmente (1864) i soci sono 118. Raddoppiano in sette anni si stabilizzano sulle 300-350 unità negli anni Novanta, in funzione della capienza della sala del Conservatorio in cui di norma si tenevano gli “esperimenti”. Grazie agli ampliamenti successivi della sala, i soci possono diventare 621 nel 1915 e più di 1500 nel 1920. Per soddisfare la sete di musica, cresce vistosamente il numero dei concerti (il termine esperimento viene messo nel cassetto nel 1898). Dapprima il numero oscilla fra 5 e 8, passa a 10 e 16 nel primo ventennio del Novecento, schizza oltre 30 e fino a 40 nei primi anni Venti (in due serie, con gli stessi artisti, di regola però con programmi diversi), scende di nuovo fra 11 e 16 negli anni Trenta.

La programmazione procede senza interruzioni durante la guerra del 1915-18 e per i primi tre anni della Seconda Guerra, però deve arrestarsi nel tempo della Repubblica Sociale. Il dopoguerra dimostra che la fedeltà dei soci è letteralmente a prova di bomba. Distrutta la Sala del Conservatorio, i concerti dal 1945 al 1958 diventano itineranti: si tengono in parte alla Scala, in parte nell’Aula Magna della Cattolica, in parte nei cinematografi Gloria e Metropol, in parte in altri luoghi, secondo disponibilità.

SocietaQuartettoMilano_Pubblico2Ricostruita la Sala Grande (1958), il numero dei concerti risale a 20 e 25. Il numero dei soci è determinato dai posti disponibili in sala e siccome sono pochissimi coloro che non rinnovano la tessera annuale, si crea il mito della “chiusura” della Società alle nuove iscrizioni. È anche per soddisfare questa crescente, e non soddisfatta, domanda di musica strumentale e da camera che negli anni Settanta a Milano nascono le nuove iniziative che rendono vivacissima la vita musicale cittadina. Che però si stipa sempre di più nella Sala Verdi del Conservatorio che ridiventa ancora una volta insufficiente; finalmente, a partire dall’autunno 2001, offre nuovo respiro alle stagioni la riapertura lungamente attesa del Teatro Dal Verme, con il suo nuovissimo Auditorium

4. La Società del Quartetto verso il 2000: “I Concerti del Quartetto”, le coproduzioni con la Scala e il progetto di integrale delle Cantate di Bach

Nel corso degli anni, la limitazione dell’accesso ai concerti ai soli Soci aveva impedito un salutare ricambio del corpo associativo, che d’altra parte si contraeva sempre più in corrispondenza del mutato contesto sociale: la progressiva decadenza, anche sul piano culturale, dei ceti sociali nel cui ambito era nato nel 1864 il Quartetto, consentendone la prosperità e la totale autosufficienza economica per oltre cent’anni, rendeva indispensabile una trasformazione del Quartetto, aprendolo a tutto il pubblico cittadino, seguendo, del resto, l’indicazione programmatica dello statuto del 1864, abbandonata dopo qualche decennio in conseguenza del notevole numero dei Soci.

quartetto_milano_HARNONCOURT-008-01.04.85

Nikolaus Harnoncourt

La Passione secondo Matteo eseguita in Santa Maria della Passione dai complessi del Concertgebouw di Amsterdam diretti da Nikolaus Harnoncourt in due serate nell’aprile 1985, mescolando i Soci del Quartetto al pubblico cittadino con una fiumana lungo via del Conservatorio quale quella descritta mirabilmente dal Gadda nell’Adalgisa, è stata senz’altro il seme dal quale è nata la riapertura del Quartetto.

Il seme ha cominciato a fruttificare cinque anni dopo, nel 1990, quando la Società del Quartetto dava vita ad una nuova associazione, “I Concerti del Quartetto”, col compito di realizzare iniziative musicali integrative della sua stagione tradizionale, ma aperte a tutto il pubblico.quartetto_milano_locandina-Abbado.ok

Già il concerto inaugurale dell’ottobre 1990, al Teatro alla Scala, col Deutsches Requiem di Brahms nella interpretazione di Sir John Eliot Gardiner col Monteverdi Choir e gli English Baroque Soloists presentava le caratteristiche che hanno segnato, talora in alternativa, talora in concomitanza, l’attività della nuova associazione nei 14 anni di sua vita: musica sacra e concerti dei massimi direttori con le più celebri orchestre europee (ospitati dal Teatro alla Scala, che, visto il successo anche economico de I Concerti del Quartetto, grazie al sostegno di importanti sponsor, col concerto di Claudio Abbado con i Berliner Philharmoniker del febbraio 1993, chiedeva di divenirne coproduttore) e programmi ciclici, sempre col sostegno di sponsor (altra novità per il Quartetto).

Giuseppe Sinopoli

Giuseppe Sinopoli

Spiccano, nei concerti scaligeri, i grandi avvenimenti sinfonici, con molti dei massimi direttori d’orchestra del mondo (già sul finire degli anni ’80 il Quartetto aveva ripreso l’antica tradizione di offrire ai Soci anche concerti sinfonici, ospitando in Conservatorio nel 1988 la Philharmonia di Londra diretta da Giuseppe Sinopoli, seguita dalla Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester diretta da Claudio Abbado nel 1989): sul podio scaligero, oltre a Claudio Abbado con i Berliner Philharmoniker, salgono Riccardo Chailly, due volte ospite con il Concertgebouw

Riccardo Chailly

Riccardo Chailly

Amsterdam, Pierre Boulez, con l’Ensemble InterContemporain e la Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie, Sir Georg Solti, Sir Colin Davis e Mstislav Rostropovich, con la London Symphony Orchestra, ancora Sir John Eliot Gardiner con l’Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique e il Monteverdi Choir, Valery Gergiev con l’Orchestra del Teatro Mariinskij – Opera Kirov, protagonisti anche del festival Notti Bianche a Milano al centro della stagione invernale milanese del 1998,

quartetto_milano_4_Boulez-Pierre

Pierre Boulez

Lorin Maazel con l’Orchestra Bayerischer Rundfunk, Semyon Bychkov con l’Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala, Giuseppe Sinopoli con la Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden ed infine nel 2005, dopo il ritorno della Scala nel suo Teatro, al termine dei lavori di ristrutturazione, ancora con i Berliner Phlharmoniker diretti da Sir Simon Rattle.

La Scala è stata altresì la sede prevalente di un’attività cameristica integrativa di quella della Società del Quartetto: memorabile l’integrale dei Quartetti di Beethoven eseguita dal Quartetto di Tokyo nell’autunno 1993 e, nella stagione del nuovo millennio, la serie dei “Grandi Pianisti alla Scala” (Alfred Brendel, Radu Lupu, Murray Perahia, Maurizio Pollini e András Schiff), anticipata negli anni precedenti dai concerti di Sviatoslav Richter (in Conservatorio) e Murray Perahia (alla Scala) ed idealmente conclusa nel giugno 2001

Murray Perahia

Murray Perahia

da Krystian Zimerman, con un recital per la riapertura del Teatro Dal Verme dedicato a Sergio Dragoni, promotore del suo recupero quale auditorium, indimenticabile amico della musica e dei musicisti, presidente del Conservatorio per un decennio negli anni ‘60/‘70 e a lungo esponente di rilievo nel “Quartetto”.

quartetto_milano_A-007-ZIMERMAN-COL

Krystian Zimerman

La Scala ha pure ospitato, col concerto del Kronos Quartet, la “prima” mondiale di un quartetto commissionato da I Concerti del Quartetto ad Azio Corghi e dedicato ad Alfredo Amman, che per molti anni, da ultimo quale Presidente, aveva sostanzialmente gestito il Quartetto con la fiducia del Consiglio.

Un’altra importante integrale beethoveniana,  è stata quella dei concerti per pianoforte interpretati da Alfred Brendel e la Tonhalle-Orchester di Zurigo diretta da David Zinman, prevalentemente ospitata alla Scala.

L’attenzione alla musica sacra, già presente nel concerto di esordio dell’autunno 1990, ha segnato un altro importante filone di attività della nuova associazione. Dapprima nel repertorio sinfonico-corale dal Rinascimento al Romanticismo, ospitato nella Basilica di San Marco: dal Vespro della Beata Vergine di Monteverdi, affidato a Sir John Eliot Gardiner con i suoi Monteverdi Choir and Orchestra, alla Creazione di Haydn nell’esecuzione di Frans Brüggen con l’Orchestra del Settecento, all’Elias di Mendelssohn diretto da Gianandrea Gavazzeni, musicista molto caro al pubblico milanese ed illustre Presidente della Società del Quartetto. Nel marzo 1995 il Quartetto Kuijken ha evocato il clima dell’esecuzione originale delle “Ultime sette parole di Cristo sulla croce” di Haydn con l’intervento dell’attore Omero Antonutti e col commento di Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi.

Il culmine di attenzione alla musica sacra è stato toccato col monumentale progetto decennale di esecuzione integrale delle Cantate (sacre e profane) di Johann Sebastian Bach, impresa non mai realizzata in Italia e all’avanguardia anche in Europa e nel mondo intero, avviato dal 1994 di concerto col Comune di Milano.

Il progetto, preannunciato da una singolare Long March per Bach offerta da Frans Brüggen con la sua Orchestra del Settecento, si è articolato in due cicli annuali di concerti (le “Settimane Bach”) e nel suo decennale percorso ha incrociato nella programmazione un itinerario storico-musicologico ispirato alla cronologia di composizione di questo mirabile opus e un criterio tematico incentrato sulle occasioni liturgiche alle quali le Cantate sacre erano originariamente destinate. La programmazione, di complessità veramente elevata, anche per l’imponente numero di direttori, complessi strumentali e corali e solisti che si sono alternati nel corso di un decennio nell’esecuzione di oltre 300 Cantate, è stata opera di Maria Majno, che al tempo stesso ha gestito la direzione artistica di tutta l’attività de I Concerti del Quartetto e, per una decina di anni a cavallo del millennio, anche della Società del Quartetto, ideando stagioni a tema (La Musica e la Natura, Musica e Nostalgia, I luoghi della Musica – Romanticismo e dintorni, Forme-Geometrie, Fin de Siècle – Capisaldi e Transizioni, Il Viaggio – Movimenti e migrazioni nel tempo della musica, Metamorfosi, Feste Danze Riti Scene, Dialoghi e Contrasti, Il Tempo, Le età dell’Uomo, Deliri e Armonie).

Le Settimane Bach, che nel 1998 hanno ricevuto il prestigioso Premio Abbiati dall’Associazione dei Critici musicali per la migliore iniziativa musicale, si sono via via arricchite di iniziative culturali dedicate all’arte, alle idee, al contesto storico, spirituale e religioso, alla civiltà in genere dell’epoca di Bach, con la pubblicazione tra l’altro di due volumi dell’opera editoriale “Il mondo delle Cantate di Bach”, curata da Christoph Wolff e Ton Koopman, e hanno esteso la loro programmazione, accompagnando il progetto di esecuzione integrale delle Cantate ed anche dopo il suo termine, entrate nella programmazione stagionale del Quartetto, alla presentazione di altri capolavori sacri sia di Bach, con frequentissime esecuzioni – molte delle quali affidate a Ton Koopman, massimo protagonista del progetto delle Cantate, fedele amico e Socio d’Onore del Quartetto, con i suoi complessi dell’ABO – dell’Oratorio di Natale (1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2011 e 2014, in occasione dei 150 anni del Quartetto), delle Passioni (secondo Giovanni nel 1992, 2001, 2005 e 2011 e secondo Matteo nel 1992, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2007 e 2011), della Grande Messa in si minore nel 1994 e 2008, sia di altri grandi, fra i quali Händel (il Messia nel 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2013 e 2014 e La Resurrezione nel 2009), Mozart (il Requiem in re minore nel 1991 e nel 2001), Haydn (la Creazione nel 1994), Monteverdi (Vespro della Beata Vergine nel 1993, 2001 e 2010), Brahms (il Requiem tedesco nel 2008, diretto da un altro grande protagonista dell’integrale delle Cantate bachiane, quale Philippe Herreweghe).

L’autunno 2004 ha visto la conclusione dell’esecuzione integrale delle Cantate, alla quale hanno partecipato tutti gli interpreti  – italiani, europei, mondiali – che si dedicano alle opere vocali del sommo Thomaskantor, affinché nell’integrale fosse rappresentato il più ampio ventaglio di concezioni interpretative. Il progetto si è così articolato in 92 concerti, con la partecipazione di 37 orchestre provenienti anche da America e Asia, 32 cori, 40 direttori (fra i quali, oltre a Ton Koopman e Philippe Herreweghe, Rinaldo Alessandrini, Giovanni Antonini, Fabio Biondi, Frans Brüggen, Christophe Coin, Michel Corboz, Marcus Creed, Ottavio Dantone, Eric Ericsson, Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Daniel Harding, Chritopher Hogwood, René Jacobs, Tonu Kaliuste, Robert King, Sigiswald Kuijken, Gustav Leonhardt, Peter Neumann, Trevor Pinnock, Helmuth Rilling, Peter Schreier, Masaaki Suzuki), 183 solisti vocali.

Il progetto, imponente anche sotto il profilo economico, è stato reso possibile, oltre che dal contributo del Comune di Milano, da quello, determinante, della Fondazione CARIPLO, dal contributo della Unione Europea, della Regione Lombardia e della Provincia di Milano, dal contributo dei Soci Sostenitori e dagli sponsor che, con diverso grado di stabilità, hanno sostenuto il progetto lungo tutto il suo percorso.

Le Settimane Bach hanno avuto una forte e stabile presenza nel panorama musicale cittadino, concorrendo a creare un pubblico “bachiano”, fortemente apprezzato dai molti musicisti stranieri che ne sono stati protagonisti. Certamente è nato da questa esperienza l’affidamento, fatto nel 1998 dal Comune di Milano, della realizzazione di Musica e poesia a San Maurizio, la storica e prestigiosa rassegna di musica antica creata da Sandro Boccardi, realizzata dal Quartetto fino al 2010, quando il Comune di Milano ne decise l’interruzione.

5. La Società del Quartetto si riapre alla città e si proietta nel nuovo millennio

Nel 2003 il seme gettato nel 1985 con la Passione secondo Matteo del 1985 aperta a tutto il pubblico milanese aveva ormai prodotto il suo frutto: da quella stagione, la Società del Quartetto apriva a tutto il pubblico milanese i concerti della sua stagione tradizionale, non più riservati ai soli Soci. I Concerti del Quartetto avevano così raggiunto l’obiettivo per il quale nel 1990 erano nati, e nei primi mesi del 2004 venivano incorporati nella Società del Quartetto, che ne proseguiva l’attività.
Da allora, il motto che aveva accompagnato negli anni la Società del Quartetto, “un privilegio per pochi”, poteva rovesciarsi: “il Quartetto: un privilegio per tutti”.

Nel frattempo, la stagione tradizionale del Quartetto proseguiva, avvicinandosi al traguardo prima del 2000 e poi, nel 2014, dei suoi 150 anni, secondo la sua linea storica: grandi interpreti, fra i quali i pianisti Leif Ove Andsnes, Emanuel Ax, Radu Lupu, Murray Perahia, Maria Joâo Pires, Maurizio Pollini, András Schiff, Mitsuko Uchida e Krystian Zimerman, violinisti quali Leonidas Kavakos, Viktoria Mullova, i violoncellisti Yo-Yo Ma, Sol Gabetta e Mario Brunello, giovani presentati dal Quartetto alla ribalta milanese, che grandi interpreti ormai lo sono divenuti (basterà citare Rafal Blechacz, Jan Lisiecki, Yuja Wang, Janine Jansen) serie integrali, soprattutto di Bach (i Sei Concerti brandeburghesi eseguiti da Jordi Savall con Le Concert des Nations nel 2013, le Suites per orchestra interpretate da Ton Koopman,  con i suoi complessi dell’ABO nel 2007, le Suites per violoncello solo nel 2006 e nel 2014), Beethoven (Leonidas Kavakos,  e Enrico Pace eseguono tutte le Sonate per violino e pianoforte nella stagione 2011/12, nelle stagioni 2012/13 e  2013/14 András Schiff,  esegue l’integrale delle Sonate per pianoforte e il Quartetto di Cremona i Quartetti per archi: è l’occasione per la pubblicazione del saggio di Schiff sulle Sonate e per la nuova edizione di quello dedicato venti anni prima da Quirino Principe all’integrale eseguita dal Quartetto di Tokyo), Dvorák, con l’integrale dei Trii con pianoforte offerta dal Trio di Parma nelle stagioni 2011/12 e 2012/13, Händel, con l’integrale delle Cantate italiane con strumenti eseguita da Bonizzoni con la Risonanza nelle stagioni 2007/8 e 2008/9.

Innumerevoli i Quartetti ospitati, non solo già al culmine di una prestigiosa carriera (l’Alban Berg, che proprio al Quartetto chiudeva la sua luminosa carriera nel 2008, il Quartetto di Tokyo, l’Emerson, il Guarneri, il Belcea, lo Jerusalem, il Lasalle, l’Arditti, l’Hagen, il Melos, il Takács), ma anche fra i più giovani, quali l’Artemis, l’Ebène, il Pavel Haas, e molti altri al loro esordio milanese (per tutti, il Quartetto di Cremona, in residence al Quartetto col già ricordato progetto di esecuzione integrale dei Quartetti di Beethoven, seguito, nel 2016, dall’integrale dei Quartetti di Mozart), il Trio Beaux Arts, il Trio di Parma.

Viene altresì ripresa la tradizione ottocentesca di commissionare nuovi lavori (Martucci aveva vinto due premi di composizione del Quartetto nel 1877 e nel 1883) a importanti e a giovani compositori non solo italiani, quali Luciano Berio, Bruno Bettinelli, Carlo Boccadoro, Niccolò Castiglioni, Silvia Colasanti, Luca Francesconi, Adriano Guarnieri, Toshio Hosokawa, Wolfgang Rihm, Salvatore Sciarrino, Marco Stroppa, Fabio Vacchi.

Le parole di un Presidente della Società del Quartetto, il grande direttore Gianandrea Gavazzeni, illustrano perfettamente lo spirito che ha animato il Quartetto nel nuovo millennio, in vista dei suoi primi 150 anni: “Il Quartetto intende continuare la sua illustre tradizione rinnovandola con l’apertura a tutte le autentiche richieste di chi non si limita ad onorare il passato, seppure illustre, ma si associa nella volontà di crescere con costanza come organismo aperto a quelle manifestazioni che comportino un livello di interesse, magari anche polemico, comunque di sicura moralità e di mestiere”.

Avvicinandosi la ricorrenza dei 150 anni dalla sua fondazione, il Quartetto si ritrovava dunque trasformato, ma senza perdere o contraddire i connotati che ne avevano contraddistinto la nascita e lo sviluppo.

I Soci non erano e non sono più tenuti ad una onerosa tassa di iscrizione (“la tassa del Quártet”, come l’aveva chiamata un illustre suo Socio, il poeta Delio Tessa: : “la tassa del Quartet che me salassa el borsin – vottanta lir…”), che dava diritto di assistere a tutti i concerti della stagione, ma era necessaria anche per assistere ad un solo concerto, non essendovi biglietti in vendita; la “tassa del Quártet” è stata ridotta, e consente ai Soci di abbonarsi all’intera stagione ovvero ad una delle serie in cui si articola (“Pianisti”, Musica da camera”, “Barocco”) o anche solo di andare ai concerti preferiti, fruendo della riduzione concessa ai Soci. E chiunque, anche non Socio, può accedere liberamente a qualsiasi concerto, acquistando il biglietto.

L’apertura ha evidentemente accelerato la contrazione del corpo associativo, ma ne ha favorito il ricambio e il notevole ringiovanimento, anche perché i giovani possono abbonarsi o acquistare il biglietto a costo ridottissimo.

6. La Società del Quartetto compie 150 anni e affronta la sfida del futuro

Ai suoi 150 anni, dunque, la Società del Quartetto non era più la società chiusa, impermeabile, nella quale si diceva che ai Soci subentrassero i figli senza nessuna possibilità di nuovi ingressi.

Certo, contare su di un corpo associativo stabile, addirittura più ampio di quello che poteva essere ospitato nella Sala Verdi del Conservatorio, come nel 1964, al compimento dei cento anni, dava una tranquillità economica e finanziaria, destinata però, come si è visto, ad esaurirsi nel corso del tempo.

I 150 anni sono stati festeggiati in vario modo: col ritorno alla Scala per un concerto della Mahler Chamber Orchestra diretta da uno dei nostri grandi direttori, Daniele Gatti, (già ospite in passato del Quartetto), con una master class per quartetti d’archi, tenuta dal Quartetto di Cremona e dal violista del grande Quartetto Berg, Hatto Beyerle, con una giornata di musica “a porte aperte” a tutta la città, il 29 giugno 1864, nella ricorrenza del primo concerto, con un concorso per una nuova composizione di quartetto (vinto dal comasco Omar Dodaro) ed un concorso per il logo dei 150 anni,  (vinto dal giovane Audric Henri Dandres), con la commissione di una pubblicazione (dal significativo titolo “La Musica borghese”), affidata ad Oreste Bossini, dedicata alle vicende del Quartetto dal 1864 al 2014, seguita da un interessante studio di Bianca De Mario, dell’Università Statale di Milano, sulla nascita, la fioritura e la quasi totale scomparsa delle Società del Quartetto in Italia; da uno studio, affidato a Martha Friel (IULM) e Filippo Cavazzoni (Istituto Bruno Leoni) su “Le società concertistiche: attività e gestione”, che ha dato lo spunto per una tavola rotonda, tenuta nell’ottobre 2014, con una folta partecipazione di addetti ai lavori. Il 7 dicembre 2014, il Sindaco di Milano ha conferito alla Società del Quartetto l’Ambrogino d’oro, la massima onorificenza milanese. Nella motivazione, si legge: “la Società del Quartetto ha accompagnato da protagonista la scena musicale di Milano per un secolo e mezzo. La Società ha svolto esemplarmente questa missione organizzando stagioni concertistiche di grande rilievo e collaborando con le istituzioni musicali cittadine a partire dal Teatro alla Scala. Il rapporto sempre più stretto con il Comune e l’apertura delle iniziative a tutta la comunità cittadina hanno rafforzato la vocazione pubblica del Quartetto facendone oggi un’istituzione amata da tutti i milanesi e una componente vitale del patrimonio culturale della città“.

La ricorrenza dei 150 anni non è stata solo l’occasione di una celebrazione. Anzi, proprio da qui s’intensifica l’attività del Quartetto per completare il passaggio da una società chiusa ad una società aperta, soprattutto rafforzando la presenza giovanile, sostenuta anche da un importante contributo triennale assegnato dalla Fondazione Cariplo, proprio nel 2014, al progetto del Quartetto “dalle nostre origini, inventiamo il futuro”.

Un futuro fatto di forte presenza giovanile, nei concertisti, nel pubblico, nelle collaborazioni necessarie per le varie attività connesse ai concerti: gli studenti di musicologia del Conservatorio, ai quali, dal 2017, è affidata la redazione delle note di sala; gli studenti dello IED – Istituto Europeo di Design – ai quali è stata affidata la proposta di nuovi format grafici e la documentazione fotografica dei concerti; un progetto editoriale sarà proposto e sviluppato in collaborazione con stagisti della Fondazione Arnoldo e Alberto Mondadori.  Il costo dei biglietti per qualsiasi concerto della stagione, anche dei massimi interpreti, da tempo fissato a soli 5 euro per i giovani sino a 26 anni, viene addirittura abbassato a 2 euro per gli studenti del Conservatorio e della Scuola di Musica Claudio Abbado.

Un futuro fatto anche di estensione dell’attività, la cui programmazione dal 2007 è stata affidata, quale Direttore Artistico, al Maestro Paolo Arcà, compositore, docente al Conservatorio di Milano (come molti dei fondatori del Quartetto nel 1864!), già direttore artistico del Teatro alla Scala e di altri enti lirici e primarie società concertistiche. Paolo Arcà propone così, oltre alla stagione tradizionale, da tutti riconosciuta come ai massimi livelli in Italia e non solo, nuove serie di concerti, specialmente per dare un palcoscenico anche a giovani musicisti tra la fine degli studi e l’inizio dell’attività professionale, destinate anche ad un pubblico nuovo, per orari (pomeridiani) e costi ridottissimi di accesso. Serie ospitate in sedi di minor capienza, rispetto alla Sala Verdi del Conservatorio, ma di grande prestigio, fra le quali la Villa Necchi Campiglio, del FAI e la Casa di Riposo per Musicisti fondata da Giuseppe Verdi.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

on May 16 | by

Comments are closed.